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Tanya Minhas: Nature Tells Its Own Story Opening Reception

POSTED ON 12.20.2019

Join us on February 7 from 5:30 - 7:30pm for the First Friday reception for the exhibition "Tanya Minhas: Nature Tells Its Own Story" in SSG's Dové Gallery.

Minhas grew up in Karachi, Pakistan, and moved to the United States to attend Princeton University. She subsequently attended graduate school at Columbia University where she began to paint portraits in oils. Minhas ventured away from figurative painting, making repetitive drawings using ink, paint, and yarn about the unseen miniscule energies that subtly direct our lives. Minhas’ work explores feelings of enforced separations, transformation, dislocation, entanglement, resuscitation and the contrasting and varied faces of beauty, destruction, rebirth, and love. Minhas’ medium of drawing is a visual expression of her own life force and spirit.

Minhas’ work explores feelings of enforced separations, transformation, dislocation, entanglement, resuscitation and the contrasting and varied faces of beauty, destruction, rebirth, and love. Minhas’ medium of drawing is a visual expression of her own life force and spirit. She has a longstanding and continuous fascination with the etheric nature of life forces in all sentient beings. Her recent art practice explores the state of harmony between the internal and the external, the visible and the invisible, and how the strength of one’s intrinsic life force affects this harmony, offering an impetus to balance our internal lives with an increasingly tempestuous external world. She is interested in the composition and states of matter, and in its transformation, direction and redirection via forces that are unseen to the human eye but are fully experiential in their effect.

Minhas’s exhibition in the Dové Gallery will include a selection of new work completed specifically for Second Street Gallery. The show will be held simultaneously with By the Strength of Their Skin, the highly-anticipated exhibition held in conjunction with shows at the Kluge-Ruhe, Fralin Museum of Art, and the Rotunda at the University of Virginia. The exhibitions in both the Main and Dové Galleries will mirror one another, both thematically and visually, and encourage a dialogue between the two spaces.

The exhibition at Second Street Gallery is curated by Kristen Chiacchia and is made possible in part by Lia Norton and Michael Livermore.

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By The Strength of Their Skin Opening Reception

POSTED ON 12.20.2019

Join us on February 7 from 5:30 - 7:30pm for the First Friday Opening Reception of "By The Strength of Their Skin", an exhibition featuring three senior Aboriginal artists, Noŋgirrŋa Marawili, Mabel Juli and Regina Pilawuk Wilson.

Each of these women artists approach their art practice through the prism of their Country, their Dreamings, and the everyday expression of living in a place where the spiritual and the quotidian are seamlessly connected. 

Noŋgirrŋa Marawili (alt. Nonggirrnga) was born c.1939 in Baniyala, North East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory. In the 1980s Noŋgirrŋa learned to paint on bark by assisting her late husband, the Djapu statesman and artists, Djutadjuta Mununggurr. After Djutadjuta’s death, Noŋgirrŋa continued to paint the Djapu themes authorized by her late husband and over time began to explore intuitive subjects and mark making outside of the realm of the sacred, gradually developing a dramatic and highly gestural style. 

Noŋgirrŋa is one of the most highly regarded Aboriginal artists of her generation, known for her sophisticated bark paintings, Larrakitj (memorial poles), and prints inspired by the atmospheric events and effects that are created as a country is brought to life through the movement of the natural elements. 

Mabel Juli was born in the early 1930s at Five Mile, near Moola Boola Station, south of Warmun, Western Australia. Following the end of the station era in the East Kimberley, Mabel settled in Warmun where she began painting in the 1980s under the encouragement of the senior artist, Queenie McKenzie. 

Mabel’s paintings articulate complex Ngarranggarni (Dreaming) stories and document early colonial encounters from her country Darrajayin, which is covered largely by Springvale Station today. Mabel’s recognition as one of Australia’s most revered painters has emerged from her consistent commitment to her art practice and her remarkable storytelling. 

Regina Pilawuk Wilson was born in 1948 in the Daly River region of the Northern Territory. She is a painter, a master weaver, and the Cultural Director of Durrmu Arts Aboriginal Corporation.

Together with her husband, Harold Wilson, Regina founded the Peppimenarti (meaning ‘large rock’) Community as a permanent settlement for the Ngan’gikurrungurr people in the Daly River region, south west of Darwin, Northern Territory, in 1973. The location of the community is an important Dreaming site for the Ngan’gikurrungurr language group, situated amid wetlands and floodplains at the center of the Daly River Aboriginal Reserve.

The exhibition at Second Street Gallery is made possible in part by Presenting Partners Pollon Art and agency, and Exhibition Partners Durrmu Arts, Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka, Warmun Art Centre in Western Australia.

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By The Strength of Their Skin Preview Reception

POSTED ON 12.20.2019

Second Street Gallery is pleased to present “By The Strength Of Their Skin”, an exhibition featuring three senior and highly regarded female Aboriginal artists, Noŋgirrŋa Marawili, Mabel Juli and Regina Pilawuk Wilson. Please join us for a special preview reception on Friday, January 24th from 5:30-7:30pm. The First Friday opening reception will be held on February 7 from 5:30-7:30pm.

Join Second Street Gallery on Thursday, March 12, 6-7:30pm for a free workshop entitled: Bark/Skin: Painting with Natural Pigments Workshop. All are welcome.

Each of these women artists approach their art practice through the prism of their Country, their Dreamings, and the everyday expression of living in a place where the spiritual and the quotidian are seamlessly connected.

Noŋgirrŋa Marawili

Noŋgirrŋa Marawili (alt. Nonggirrnga) was born c.1939 in Baniyala, North East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory. In the 1980s Noŋgirrŋa learned to paint on bark by assisting her late husband, the Djapu statesman and artists, Djutadjuta Mununggurr. After Djutadjuta’s death, Noŋgirrŋa continued to paint the Djapu themes authorized by her late husband and over time began to explore intuitive subjects and mark making outside of the realm of the sacred, gradually developing a dramatic and highly gestural style. Noŋgirrŋa is one of the most highly regarded Aboriginal artists of her generation, known for her sophisticated bark paintings, Larrakitj (memorial poles), and prints inspired by the atmospheric events and effects that are created as a country is brought to life through the movement of the natural elements.

Mabel Juli

Mabel Juli was born in the early 1930s at Five Mile, near Moola Boola Station, south of Warmun, Western Australia. Following the end of the station era in the East Kimberley, Mabel settled in Warmun where she began painting in the 1980s under the encouragement of the senior artist, Queenie McKenzie. Mabel’s paintings articulate complex Ngarranggarni (Dreaming) stories and document early colonial encounters from her country Darrajayin, which is covered largely by Springvale Station today. Mabel’s recognition as one of Australia’s most revered painters has emerged from her consistent commitment to her art practice and her remarkable storytelling.

Regina Pilawuk Wilson

Regina Pilawuk Wilson was born in 1948 in the Daly River region of the Northern Territory. She is a painter, a master weaver, and the Cultural Director of Durrmu Arts Aboriginal Corporation. Together with her husband, Harold Wilson, Regina founded the Peppimenarti (meaning ‘large rock’) Community as a permanent settlement for the Ngan’gikurrungurr people in the Daly River region, south west of Darwin, Northern Territory, in 1973. The location of the community is an important Dreaming site for the Ngan’gikurrungurr language group, situated amid wetlands and floodplains at the center of the Daly River Aboriginal Reserve.

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Closing Reception for Beatrix Ost and Doug Young

POSTED ON 12.20.2019

Join us on Friday, January 10 from 5:30 - 7:30pm as we say farewell to "Illuminations & Illusions," an exhibition spanning over four decades of Beatrix Ost’s career as a visual artist, and "The Slow Death of Rocks," by Doug Young. This will be your LAST CHANCE to see the exhibition that has challenged and delighted audiences with its evocative and dreamlike work.

The exhibition catalogue, rose oil, and CD will be available for purchase at the reception.

This exhibition is made possible by IX Art Park.

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