News

Artist Spotlight: Morgan Craig

POSTED ON 1.29.2016

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: MORGAN CRAIG


On view through January 29, 2016, “Sustainability” showcases work from seven regional artists whose work expresses complementary environmental themes. We’re glad to share this short interview with one of the artists, Morgan Craig.

How would you describe your work?
I aspire to prompt others to consider what free trade, deregulated capitalism, the ever-growing divide between the rich and poor, and globalization has done, and continues to do to working class individuals and families throughout the world. I also intend for audiences to consider what different edifices can communicate about broader social and cultural processes.

Can you describe your process of making work?
My work begins with research, be it online or at the local library. I then visit the place of interest. If I determine that the aesthetic, as well as the history falls within the trajectory of my concept, I will then make sketches and take photographs of the interior of the space, or spaces. I then use both as tools for creating each painting.

Can you tell us about the subject of the paintings in the show?
The work exhibited in the show at Second Street involves three subjects: the Packard Motor Car Company in Detroit, Michigan, a facility that manufactures plastics in Nebraska, and the Bethlehem Wireworks in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Both the wireworks and the plastics factory abound with activity. These two facilities represent how manufacturing can still remain profitable and egalitarian, within the United States.

What are you currently working on?
I am interested in countries, which fall within the former Soviet Union, that possess edifices from that time period, and have experienced and continue to experience the effects of Capitalism in Communism’s wake. After spending time in Armenia and Georgia last summer, I wish to expand upon my research through a series of paintings.
Where can we see more of your work? My work is in three shows concurrently. One is a solo exhibition at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center in Nebraska City, Nebraska. The second is a group exhibit at the Huntington Museum of Art in Huntington, West Virginia. The third is a solo show at Salisbury University in Salisbury, Maryland. I will be giving a talk on February 18th in Nebraska City, and March 10th in Salisbury.
 

image gallery


Artist Podcast: Eric Kniss

POSTED ON 1.29.2016

Eric Kniss talks about his work, on display as part of "Sustainability" at SSG through January 2016. More of Eric Kniss work can be seen at www.erickniss.com.

 

image gallery


Artist Spotlight: J. Michael Simpson

POSTED ON 1.29.2016

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: J. MICHAEL SIMPSON

On view through January 29, 2016, “Sustainability” showcases work from seven regional artists whose work expresses complementary environmental themes. We’re glad to share this short interview with one of the artists, J. Michael Simpson.

How would you describe your work?
Current technologies have so dramatically reduced the time it takes to collect and transport information of past events that virtual facsimiles can be experienced almost simultaneously. Coupled with how virtual information is often viewed as simulacrum; more real than the ‘real,’ it is easy to see how our perception of time and place has become altered. To explore this perceptual change I use digital video recordings of white-water turbulence and document the site with date/time stamps and GPS information. The video recordings are used to make video shorts, drawings and paintings of the site. The time and/or place information is drawn or screen-printed on the drawings or paintings. That creates a tension between the time and place references (“then” and “there”) as the artwork is experienced (‘here’ and ‘now’). These work are intended to acknowledge the awkwardness of dealing with place and time in today’s world of virtual technology.

Can you describe your process of making work?
The work in this exhibition attempts to fuse video and traditional media as one while closely examining the illusive moment in time. Each work is derived from video clips of river turbulence that are made into three-minute, stop-action-like videos. The videos are edited and used as referents for video shorts and drawings. The act of drawing and the videos (made to look like drawings) were used to suggest that each work is a transcription of a past event and more that is has a sense of the immediacy; a moment in time ‘now.’ Many of the works in this show have date/time stamps included as part of the imagery. That information is accepted as simulacrum for the place and the time that was originally experienced. They set a context for the work as an object referring to another event in time than ‘now.’ So the artwork, in gallery, is now and not now simultaneously.

How does the natural world inform what you make?
In this body of work images of white-water rivers are used as symbols for the ever-changing flux of life and the incessant flow of time. Like life and time, the river is always moving and never in one place. No ripple of water or human event will ever reoccur at the same place, time and intensity. Consider the old adage of Heraclitus (c. 500 B.C.); that you can never step into the same river twice. Perhaps trying to create work from the fast moving water of a white water river is a fool’s endeavor. Nonetheless, for me, it was fascinating. The ever changing and uncountable riffs, ripples, waves, splashes, splatters, and drips captivated my attention. I wanted to understand the form, color, and pattern of each splash and splatter. I saw each ripple, wave, and drop rushing toward and unknown, but determined end which makes clear to me that the forces of nature are synonymous with the human spirit.

What are you currently working on?
In my studio I am currently working on similar works for an exhibition entitled “In Motion: In Absentia.” The exhibition will include two former students: Alyssa Kimbrough uses repeated still images of dancers in paintings. Michael Haag is a 3-D artist who has recreated 19th century model stands that help artists’ models hold still. They are interactive works. The audience will be video taped using the stands. I will be showing works that include mixed media works. Each work is composed of a 3 minute, looped video of a rivers surface turbulence, a graphite drawing on wood of 1 second of still images edited from the looped video, and a painting of a still frame from the same video. Each of us deals with the idea of movement, but in unique ways.

Where can we see more of your work?
In addition to the “Sustainability” exhibition my work is currently being shown at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte’s Rowe Galleries. The title of the Show is ‘No Place In Time.” It is a mixed media exhibition of video, painting, and drawing that explores the tension between the time and place references (“then” and “there”) and as the artwork is experienced (‘here’ and ‘now’). These work are intended to acknowledge the awkwardness of dealing with place and time in today’s world of virtual technology. The show opened in January 11, 2016 and will close on February 4, 2016. “In Motion: In Absentia” will be on display at the York County Art Council in Rock Hill, South Carolina from March 18 through April 4, 2016.
 

image gallery


Artist Spotlight: Stefan Chinov

POSTED ON 1.29.2016

“SUSTAINABILITY” ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: STEFAN CHINOV

On view through January 29, 2016, “Sustainability” showcases work from seven regional artists whose work expresses complementary environmental themes. We’re glad to share this short interview with one of the artists, Stefan Chinov.

How would you describe your work?
My work is mostly in sculpture but drawing and photography continuously compliment the three-dimensional work. The objectives of my work are primarily visual, focused on direct relationships between forms and materials, and what they represent or stand for. In a parallel, somewhat introspective direction, I think about the authenticity of our perceptions, which sometimes seem to be caught in a conflict of priority between objects and images.

Can you describe your process of making work?
I photograph the sculptural work all the time and the photographs inform its development. The photographs exhibited at Second Street however, are a little different. Most of them are taken at the Bulgarian Antarctic Base on Livingston Island with a handmade pinhole camera—a small wood box that “inhales” the space around it as opposed to epitomizing it. They show landscapes and human presence in a mixed manner of documentation and reflection. The images engage directly with the landscape, with the natural world (to address the next question as well) but what they end up as is a thing on its own. The images, no matter what they represent, have a substance of their own and their qualities (and purposes), if anything, are aesthetic. I couldn't have done this with lenses and a clean, sharp image that is completely subordinated to its content. In this sense, the pinhole camera is a tool of distancing. The pinhole camera provides the possibility for a "surface". It's a method that relates to the physicality of the subject—it captures the flow of time, not just a momentary appearance—but it also relates to the object that bears the image, the box that defines it by its dimensions, the film that records it, and the surface on which it's printed. The two plaster casts shown alongside the photographs stand for that, the desire to physically and directly respond to what you see.

How does the natural world inform what you make?
I act upon what I see. However, along the lines of what I said above, the process and the nature of the work are no longer the natural world even if it's represented. What remains of it is the motivation to act upon things and events that surround us.

What are you currently working on?
Lately I've been working from observation, traditionally, modeling in clay and casting in plaster. I was looking forward to getting back to this. It's consoling and it makes me feel I am doing something in good faith, without forcing arrogated themes onto the work. It's a borderline, a melting point, as abstract as I can imagine and as representational as it can be.

Where can we see more of your work?
The easiest way to see my work would be my website, www.stefanchinov.com, though it really needs an update to add some of the more recent work that I just mentioned. Some upcoming shows in the area where I live, Dayton, OH, might also be an opportunity, if you happen to be around in the spring and the summer of this year.

image gallery


Previous Page   Next Page